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Posts under ‘Navigation’

FlightAware – Live Commercial and GA IFR Flight Tracking site

I just came across FlightAware, a live flight tracking site that you can use to follow the usual commercial airline flights but also any flight under IFR. This could be a useful tool for individuals watching their loved ones en route or instructors/FBOs wishing to follow their IFR flights out in the field. In addition [...]

The Winds of Flight – a meteorologists guide to flying

Mr Robinson developed this e-book from his experiences teaching meteorology to pilots and his desire to spread his knowledge of his field to as many people as possible. Its written in a very readable style based on real world examples rather that the traditional theoretical approach found in other texts.There are any number of excellent texts discussing aviation-related weather, some of my favorites being Robert Buck’s Weather Flying, Thomas Horne’s Flying America’s Weather and Jeppesen’s Aviation Weather is also a very well illustrated text book.

Interesting facts on VFR Aeronautical Charts

Whilst at Airventure last week I sat in on a presentation by John Moore from the National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO) who talked about some interesting and little known facts about the various VFR charts we use.

Airspace & Weather minimums

A question from yesterday’s Sport Pilot quiz highlighted one of topics that isn’t difficult but requires a bit of memorization to make it stick – weather minimums in different classes of airspace.The question was as follows:Light Sport Pilot Question: 0205_15During operations within Class E airspace at altitudes of less than 1,200 feet AGL, the minimum horizontal distance from clouds requirement for flight is: A – 500 feetB – 1000 feetC – 2000 feetThe correct answer is B. During operations within Class E airspace at altitudes of less than 1,200 feet AGL, the minimum horizontal distance from clouds requirement for flight is 2000 feet.

Online Thunderstorm Avoidance MiniCourse at ASF

Thunderstorms are a fact of life during the summer months and whilst the various FAA knowledge tests provide a theoretical background to thunderstorms, how and why they form (remember you need moisture, an unstable atmosphere and a lifting action) and best course of action to deal with them (avoid by at least 20 miles), they can’t cover more real life situations…. ATC is a vital partner in dealing with weather aloft so its well worth knowing more about how they can help should you need to call on them.The ASF has a number of other online courses that are also well worth investigating, covering topics such as Mountain Flying, Airspace, Runway incursions, ATC and IFR operations.